Daily Archives: October 30, 2010

Todd Day Wait’s Pigpen goes on the road in a vegetable oil powered airport van – finds new artists to jam with as he travels

Todd Day Wait’s approach to music is exciting and refreshing. Traveling all over the country performing with different musicians ensures his music will always bring something new and unexpected. One of my favorite tracks is “Nowhere To Be” because it truly embodies the spirit of Todd Day Wait’s Pigpen. This is truly music without labels.

Todd Day Wait takes his musical agenda, his group called Todd Day Wait’s Pigpen, on the road across the country in what was once a 1997 airport shuttle van. The vehicle runs on half vegetable oil and half diesel.

By Connor Elfrink

September 9, 2010 | 12:00 a.m. CST

Todd is really a very talented musician. Check out this solo performance of his song “I Sure Love You.”

Todd Day Wait’s Pigpen has been rolling around the country and squeaking out filthy R&B, reggae and soul grooves since 2009. Some musicians take time to craft an eccentric name for their bands, but for Todd Day Wait’s Pigpen, a simple name and a constant rotation of musicians do just fine.

Todd Day Wait’s Pigpen is an environmentally focused band that finds new musicians on the road to jam with each show. Frontman Todd Day Wait is a former member of Columbia’s East Ash Street Band and makes his way around the country in a 1997 airport shuttle van that has been converted to run half on vegetable oil and half on diesel.

Wait’s van represents his musical drive to create a gypsy caravan of sounds, as well as his ability to achieve collaborative musical excellence. The band once made it almost 400 miles from Chicago to Columbia on only $40. Wait panhandles at various mom-and-pop restaurants and McDonald’s for used grease to convert into fuel. He says people support his mode of travel. “There is a pretty strong underground network,” he says.

Wait doesn’t encourage people to eat fried food, but he says Americans seem unwilling to stop, so he would rather put the habit toward something less wasteful. He hopes to encourage others to look into alternative forms of transportation and fuel. “The best part is not giving money to BP,” Wait says. Continue reading

The FL Studio Chord Tool – [Tutorial]

In this tutorial we are going to cover how to use FL Studio’s chord tool to make putting chords in much easier. Reading a chord name is relatively easy but knowing which notes go into the chord is not something everyone knows. That’s where this tool comes in handy. As long as you know how to read the chord name you can easily insert chords into a piano roll with the chord tool.

This particularly useful if you want to remix or redo a pop or rock song that’s normally played on a guitar or piano and you can find the chord sheet online in or in a book. Ironically, the chords to Pachelbel’s Cannon in D is the basis for some of the most popular rock and pop songs of the 20th century. With this in mind, let’s use the chord to help us recreate Cannon in D!

Continue to Tutorial

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AmpliTube 2 for iPhone & Good Points about Handheld Music Workflow

AmpliTube, coupled with a US$40 (street) iRig, lets you record and monitor simultaneously via a single 1/4″ jack input. Other accessories work, as well. Stick this next to your other gear, and you can always record and add effects to sounds as you create them.

AmpliTube 2 arrives today with new effects, recording, bounce to audio, export/import, practice tools, and in-app purchase of extra stomp modules. I’ve been playing with a pre-release version for the last few days. Combined with an audio interface like IK Multimedia’s own iRig, AmpliTube 2 turns your iPhone or iPod touch into a handheld, pocket-able workstation.

But let’s step back for a moment and consider what that means. What would you want a device to do for your music if that device fit in the palm of your hand?

Last week, I raised the question of physical size, inspired by a great quote by Sasha Frere-Jones – there regarding listening, not creation, but just as apt. The message was, in short, size matters. An iPhone is not an amp. But an amp – a big box designed for the purpose of making lots of sound – is not an ideal practice tool. So, one of the clear advantages of something like AmpliTube is the ability to plug in a personal listening device and just practice, complete with effects and amp sounds, without disturbing others. AmpliTube 2 accordingly adds news practice tools, by importing sounds and allowing you to adjust speed of playback, ideal for learning tracks.

But AmpliTube isn’t just for guitarists wanting a pocket-sized practice amp. With AmpliTube’s beefed-up recording capabilities and effects, it becomes a handheld recording sketchpad, not only for guitarists but anyone wanting to record, well, anything. That has two advantages. It’s mobile, so you can record in a practice studio without opening up a whole laptop. But more subtly, it can be a tool better-suited to sketching ideas and building the raw materials of a track than a full-blown DAW is.

Think of it this way: you’re fiddling with a synth, or playing a quick guitar line, or making sounds with a toy you got off of eBay. Sure, you could immediately open your DAW, but then you’re in the mindset of a tool designed to build finished tracks. For play and exploration, staying away from the computer, and using something scaled to your hand that you can carry anywhere, can be a big boon to performance. As we saw with Moog’s Filtatron earlier this month, having a tool that not only records audio but adds some creative effects enroute can be a whole lot of fun. Now, you can add AmpliTube to the same category.

Continue Article at CreateDigitalMusic For Full AmpliTube 2 Specs

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