Category Archives: Interviews

Left Lane Cruiser “Junkyard Speed Ball” [NEW MUSIC]

So I was at the liquor store today buying myself some delicious treats.  I sauntered though the whiskey and bourbon aisle perusing the selection.  Wasn’t in the mood.  Last night wasn’t supposed to be one of those “what the hell happened and why do I have a tattoo of a ninja turtle on my rear end” kind of nights.  I got home and saw a text that read “Left Lane Cruiser, get after it.”  Checked my e-mail and there was a zip file with the same title.  I listened, without a word walked across the street, bought every single bottle of whiskey they had in stock and yelled “Cowabunga!” while a man named “Sneaky Dave” drew a terrible rendition of Michaelanglo on my ass just because I already knew where this night was going.  This is the blues, this is loud, this is Left Lane Cruiser.

Set Me Down – Left Lane Cruiser

Am I right or am I right?

This whiskey fueled two-man frenzy of blues-driven rock’n’roll noise straight from Fort Wayne, Indiana promise to hit you like a shock wave and show you a foot-stompin’ good time.

I couldn’t have said it better myself.  With Freddie J IV completely shredding on guitar and Brenn “Sausage Paw” Beck on “drums, trash and hollering” this two man duo is a machine that will chew you up and spit you out without hesitation or effort.  They have released 4 records and their most recent record “Junkyard Speedball” is a complete monster.  If your going to call a record “Junkyard Speed Ball” it better be fast, it better have raw emotion, it better have grit and it better have… well I’ll just let them show you.  They would have punched me in the face for talking to much already anyway.

Justify – Left Lane Cruiser

There’s not much I have to say that the band hasn’t already said.  The gritty vocals, the DIRTY DIRTY DIRTY guitar, the pounding drums and the trash just come together and make me cross-eyed with pleasure.  The volume is awesome, this is good mood blues at 100 miles per hour.

I’d definitely compare these guys to the likes of ‘The Black Keys’ because they have that same two man dynamic with no bass guitar.  I would ‘un-compare’ them to ‘The Black Keys’ because I hate having to make comparisons in the first place and these guys are just different.  Yes the instrumentation is the same.  Left Lane Cruiser is fast, faster than everyone else.  They have a certain whiskey fueled anger to their music.  They site the North Mississippi Hill Country Blues as an influence.  I’m already familiar with the Dickinson Family and the North Mississippi All Stars (you should be too) and man does that just click and make sense.  This song is called “Big Momma.”  Time for 5 more shots.

Big Momma – Left Lane Cruiser

So basically all I have to say is, you’re welcome.  If you like rock and you like the blues Left Lane Cruiser is for you.  Honestly I haven’t been this excited about a band in a while.  Go out and buy their music.  They are on iTunes HERE.  I received the “Junkyard Speed Ball” from a friend, but I definitely coughed up a couple bucks to hear what else these guys have to say and trust me its worth it.  They are currently bar hoping and playing a bunch of smaller festivals in the Mid West.  Tour page is HERE.   If you live there I envy you like I have never envied anything before.  This band will give you a hangover.  This band is heavy.  Enjoy.

Heavy – Left Lane Cruiser

By: Steve Rippin | Beat-Play Ambassador Los Angeles | @stevewithMWL|Music Without Labels & Beat-Play, LLC

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Hey Champ “Star” [NEW MUSIC]

OK dudes and lady dudes.  Get your dancing shoes on throw some glitter in your hair.  Hey Champ hails from Chicago, IL and they blend house, indie rock and disco into their amped synthtastic sounds.  Yes I know, I’m sweating just thinking about it.  Let’s get into their most recent full length release ‘Star’.

Shake – Hey Champ

As you can see these guys are a party.  With a primary emphasis on all things synthesizer, sweet beats and raging guitar this music is just plain fun to listen to.  They site “The 80’s” as an influence on their facbook page and as you can hear from the opening chords of the first tune “Shake” they aren’t holding anything back.  Dance pop/ rock at its finest.

“Hey Champ’s roots can be traced outside of Chicago in nearby Rockford, where band members Saam Hagshenas (Vocals, Guitar) and Jonathan Marks (Vocals & Drums) discovered their love of music at a young age. After Saam’s graduation from law school, Jon’s fellow Princeton Pete Dougherty (Synths) moved to Chicago, cementing the lineup of the group.”

One of my favorite songs is called ‘Cold Dust Girl’.  An upbeat summer anthem ‘Cold Dust Girl’ is a great example of the simplicity in the song writing and the bands ability to create catchy hook on top of catchy melody.  Now who wants to watch hot hipster chicks dance in extreme slow motion and make out with each other?

Cold Dust Girl – Hey Champ

I said it once and I’ll say it again.  ‘Hey Champ’ is freakin’ fun.  As far as I can tell they don’t take themselves too seriously.  Which comes through in the music not because it’s sloppy or anything like that, but because these guys are trying just have a good time playing loud and making people dance.

After listening to this record I can only imagine what a live show would be like, but I’d put a weeks pay that I walk out of there a sweaty mess.  They state on their facebook page that their band influences are Crochet, Pottery, Antiquing.  I just really glad we have something in common.  BOOM!  Title Track.

Star – Hey Champ

“Hey Champ” has ZERO tour dates listed and I’m pissed.  Hopefully they get some dates up there soon/ just play shows in my house or LA forever.  They just released an EP called ‘Anything At All EP.’ that and their full length offering ‘Star’ are AVAILABLE HERE FOR CHEAP.  At 4 bucks for the EP and 6 bucks for the record you are literally stealing from this band so I suggest you buy it before they catch on.  Here’s the last track from ‘Star’ and a video for another awesome song called “Neverest”.

Steampunk Camelot – Hey Champ

Can’t wait for this band to get back on the road and play some shows. Ummm, Synth pop rules.  (I had a harder time than I thought I would trying to end this blog… deal with it.)

By: Steve Rippin | Beat-Play Ambassador Los Angeles | @stevewithMWL|Music Without Labels & Beat-Play, LLC

Danielson “Best of Gloucester County” [NEW MUSIC]

I bought a pair of wooden sunglasses today.  I also heard a band called ‘Danielson’.  Both happenings made my day.  ‘Danielson’ has a great, fresh sound.  One part loud perfect imperfections  and the other part pretty rockin’ for a folky acoustic outfit.  Danielson is weirdly religious.  I am not however, so this blog with be pure music…

Grow Up – Danielson

Daniel Christopher Smith is ‘Daneilson’.  He has an ever revolving family of musicians he plays with.

“Danielson has, during the five years, let go (reluctantly, perhaps) of some family collaborators—namely his brothers Andrew and David, the percussionists, and childhood friends Chris and Ted, on keys and bass/guitar respectively. While sisters Megan and Rachel and Daniel’s wife Elin, the essential chorus for many a Danielson Famile song, still appear, the bulk ofBest of Gloucester County revolves around a completely new “team.”

His new band consists of musicians from in and around Gloucester County in New Jersey.  Evan Mazunik plays piano and organ while Joshua Stamper holds it down on bass with Patrick Berkery rounding out the rhythm section on drums.  Andrew Wilson plays electric guitar and the one and only Sufjan Stevens plays banjo which is pretty incredible.  Pretty awesome instrumentation and extremely talented musicians support Danielson making this record really professional, fun and exciting to listen to.

Lil Norge – Danielson

I like the “obla-di-obla-da”-ness of the tune ‘Lil Norge’.  It’s a fun bouncy little tune complimenting the heavy hand of “Grow Up,” which come before it on the record.  One awesome thing among many on this record is that the songs individually are completely unique.  I think thats what drew me in.  I listened to the first couple tracks because they were loud and in my face.  As I continued into the guts of “Best Of Gloucester County” I got completely swept away.  Each song was different in its own awesome unique way (I know I already used it once, but it’s true so deal).  The guitar definitely drives this record.

Danielson’s sometimes piercing vocals actually work with the guitars and the choppiness of the music.  A good example of this is the song ironically is called “But I Don’t Wanna Sing About Guitars.”

But I Don’t Wanna Sing About Guitars – Danielson

As the record continues it get a little quieter and quieter.  Songs like ‘You Sleep Good Now’ and ‘Denominator Bluise’ are quiet simple as that.  I don’t really know why the track list isn’t mixed a little bit better, but there’s obviously a reason in ‘Daneilson’s’ head.  Artists intuition I guess.  It’s not bad, but I just expected the end of the record to be a little bit like the beginng.  All in all it’s a solid effort straight though.  The song writing is fantastic and with musicians like Sufjan Stevens playing banjo on your record ‘Danielson’ holds his music to a very high standard.  This is the bands fifth release and although I can’t speak for their prior releases I will say that “Best of Gloucester County” is worth while feel good music to listen to.  With that said I’ll leave you with a soft end to the record, “Hosanna in the Forest”

Hosanna in The Forest – Danielson

Check out Danielson’s tour page for more info on that although it doesn’t look like they have anything coming up too soon.  Do yourself a favor and download “Best of Gloucester County” HERE.  I guess it must be the old punch your listener in the face and then play quiet nice music to relax them and get them to forgive you method.  For me it’s working.  I forgive you.

PS.  I got to include this video of “Did I Step On Your Trumpet”.  It’s so wierd.

By: Steve Rippin | Beat-Play Ambassador Los Angeles | @stevewithMWL|Music Without Labels & Beat-Play, LLC

Behind The Board : Mick Cronin [Interview]

Q01 Who are you, What do you do & where are you based?

Mick Cronin. Producer, engineer, drummer. Transmission Studios, Drumlish, Ireland.

Q02 What album,track,gig or producer inspired you to end up behind a mixing board?

I was always intrigued at how sounds were made, Strawberry Fields was a real big one for me as a child.

Q03 Where did you study your trade?

I’m basically self taught. I have picked up some great tips and tricks from some of the people I have worked with. The likes of Phil Vinall, Karl Odlum and Richard Formby taught Me alot. I was never one of those musicians who left or started playing computer games as soon as they had finished their parts, I always stuck around and asked questions.

Q04 What advice do you have for any budding engineers out there?

Just do it, record on anything you have from a 4 track to an mbox. The more you do the more you learn.

Q05 What people in the biz do you look up to or aspire to be like?

There are plenty. Ger McDonnall who my band The Aftermath is a great inspiration at the mo. His jobs are so varied from classical things with The Priests to The Manic Street Preachers new stuff. His approach to sound is always get the best out of the song.

Q06 Analog or Digital? Tape or DAW? Outboard or Plugin?

I don’t think it matters anymore. The most important thing in any recording is performance.

Q07 What 3 pieces of gear could you not live without?

At the minute my new focasrite isa 828 pres. The old SE R1 Ribbon mics and a 57.

Q08 What do you think is the best mixed record of all time?

I think the first side of Van Morrison’s Moondance is absolute sonic perfection but most of that is down to the songs/performance.

Q09 What do you do on your downtime from Studio/Live?

At the moment not a lot but I do like  exploring exotic city’s.

Q10 If you werent an enginneer, what would you be doing instead?

I have no idea, I’d probably be on the building site.

Q11 What was your 1st professional album,mix/master job?

Hard to say as I worked on a lot of bits and pieces of albums but from start to finish tracking and mixing would be “Crimson’s Untamed Underground Unwell

Q12 What is some of the recent works you’ve been part of?

A lot going on new album by Matt McManamon from the Dead 60s. Really enjoying work with Shayne Thomas Byrne. Duncan Patterson album tracking just finished and I’m also due to do some recording the actor Patrick Bergin in a few weeks.

you can keep up to date with Mick on Facebook

By: Shayne Byrne | Beat-Play Ambassador Ireland | @shaynewithMWL | Music Without Labels & Beat-Play, LLC

Mr. Sakitumi – Debut Album – “Secret Asian Man” & Interview [MUSIC NEWS]

 

mr sakitumi

Multi-instrumentalist, producer and live stage performer,Mr Sakitumi, is releasing his much anticipated debut album through African Dope Records TODAY (June 8, 2011)!   An innovative musical phenomenon the likes of Mr Sakitumi is few and far in between in the world of electronic music. From the studio to the stage, he’s mastered his vast array of physical and virtual tools to produce his first solo album ‘SECRET ASIAN MAN’.  This comes after being a member of numerous influential South African acts such as Max Normal, Lark, Krushed & Sorted, Closet Snare, and Mr Sakitumi & The Grrrl, along with performances in Goldfish, Freshly Ground, EJ von Lyrik, Gazelle and many more.

I was lucky enough to meet up with Mr. Sakitumi here in Cape Town before a performance for an interview about his music and hopes for ‘Secret Asian Man.’

Secret Asian Man

When did you start playing musical instruments and how many do you play?

I started when I was about nine years old, I started with classical piano, I started lessons like that and basically branched out from piano to all the various instruments I play now.

And when did you start layering the different instruments and experimenting with electronic music?

I think I just have always been into experimenting with sound.  When I start learning one instrument I get inquisitive – how does another instrument work in context to it (the previous instrument I’m playing) and I play around with that.  Before I knew it I was starting to play quite a couple instruments but a bit more fluently than just jamming around.  I started actually performing with them in bands, and then it just kind of grew from there.  And, then electronic music aspect also came into the picture because it was like another instrument that I was learning and it just happened to allow me to combine them all into making production together.

I know that you have collaborated a lot in the past, how long have you been working on an individual album?

It’s been a long process… years in the making.  I never pushed to make it, I’ve always just made tracks.  This album is a combination of ideas from way back and some stuff that’s quite recent.  So, when I first started out I never initially said, I want to do an album.  I just wanted to write tunes and started getting into electronic music using the sound player as an electronic music instrument.  It kind of grew from there and eventually I started building up more tracks, and I just needed to let go and let some music be out there, as Mr. Sakitumi. Because I’ve done a lot of albums with other bands, as band member or collaborator, or session recorder and so on.

And, how has it been different producing solo versus collective?

When you’re in the band its always quite cool because your part of the whole, so you just need to focus on your one aspect, your one instrument, or one part of the writing process.  When you’re doing it on your own your encompassing all of that and you also only consult with yourself the whole time, which can be a good thing and a bad thing, you have all this control, but then you also have so much control that you hold on too strong.  You need the process of letting go; when you know the song is ready you let it go.  I kind of enjoy that with the band context because you get everyone pushing their ideas together and then let it out, but I also enjoy doing solo compositions as well.

So do you like having both?

Yea, they kind of even each other out – it’s like winter and summer, they work well together.  It makes you appreciate each aspect.   So doing a solo I appreciate doing band collaborations, and vice versa.

What drove you to pursue a career in music and what is it that drives you individually as a musician?

It wasn’t always there as a defined career.  I’ve always played music, I was originally studying to be something else, but eventually dropped out of my studies, and there was always that pressure from society to not really do music as a career.  Because it’s not really seen as a profession, but I always had it on the side, and then one day I just decided that I’ve built up enough of a platform musically and I said ok I’m going to do this and I think that changed quite a lot for me, it helped me build bigger blocks on it by actually saying I’m going to do this.  I’ve just been fortunate to be surrounded by really talent people – I’ve played with really amazing bands and amazing players and surrounded by really cool people who support what I’m doing as well.  It really helps a lot because your up against quite a lot of odds and to have people around you who are helping you and giving you support and drive definitely helps.  From an inspiration point of view I just love sound, I love music.  It’s inspirational for me to hear something that moves me and it makes me really enjoy what I do because I’m hoping in the same way, anything I do can move somebody else.

What kind of things do you do to promote yourself?

I’ve got a team of people that help me.  I wouldn’t say it’s my strongest point, but I am learning about it as a solo artist, because being a band member I’ve always left that job up to somebody else in the band.  And, now I’m actually learning more about it and understanding the importance of marketing and promoting because at the end of the day if you have a diamond in your pocket and no one knows about it, its not worth anything so, I can have all these songs and have this whole persona and package and everything but if no one knows about it, it doesn’t get out there as much.

So, for promoting, I’m adding little viral videos and post them and get more people like you to find me and write about me and it helps other people discover me.

What are your thoughts on the future of the music industry and where do you see it going?

I can’t really tell, it all moves so much and the dynamics have changed drastically in the past couple of years, I really can’t say what it’s going to be.  I can say the digital age has become a stronger point in the music industry and it comes with it’s ups and downs, but it’s definitely where the majority of the future of the music industry is sitting at the moment.  I can’t say where it’s going to go from there, but that’s where I’m viewing it.  But, I think people still enjoy tangible things in music as well.  Definitely, live performance is still quite an essential part of any artist.  People still love to see the artist playing.  The live aspect is very important; the digital thing is more just the fact of actual physical sales.  As far as marketing and stuff it definitely opens doors for me, for people to know about my stuff from somewhere else in the world.  Before, they would never come across my music or anything I’m doing.  But, people so enjoy tangibility – I think vinyls are coming back in a weird way.  I think were planning our album that we might have a limited vinyl release, because it’s quite a collectable to do.

What prompted Secret Asian Man and how did it evolve?

Secret Asian man encompasses the electronic side of what I’ve been doing as a musician – over quite a couple of years.  It started back when I first got my sound player, my first electronic instrument – and I was making little bits of music on there – so some of the tracks date back to rough ideas from years ago, and being able to play various instruments I was able to add to that later on. Especially now that I have my own home studio, I’ve been able to track my live playing.  So its evolved – from being strictly more sample based to digital to more organic and now live playing.

The album – I had to compile the best of the tracks that I’ve done – and I have quite a lot of tracks.  I had to let go (of some) – these are the ones that represent my sound, my melodies and my beats at the moment at this point in time. 

What are your reasons for being an independent artist?

Well, first of all I am very left of center anyway – I’m not very mainstream to begin with, so, being independent is almost an automatic situation.  It’s also – to choose to be that – I’m allowing myself to have more freedom.  I’m releasing to African Dope records, and they’ve been really cool, with the album and the kind of sound that I’m doing, and that helps me to not have to compromise anything.

What struggles have you faced with getting your music heard and getting your name recognized by outside markets?

It’s a massive world out there, and also as I’ve said how the digital age has helped everyone been known, in the same sense there’s an ocean of people out there who are putting their stuff out there, the same as what I’m trying to do so it becomes really hard, just to be heard and make a unique statement or standpoint.  It definitely helps with people like you, musicwithoutlabels, and various other blogs that picked up on me in some way – and from overseas, not just South African based, and shown interest to tell other people.  I suppose it all starts with that kind of thing.  The world is about people talking about things and then spreading it and that’s how I suppose all the social networks help that aspect from an independent point of view.

By: Elizabeth Stene | Beat-Play Ambassador South Africa | @LizMWL | Music Without Labels & Beat-Play, LLC

The Belle Brigade [NEW MUSIC]

Ethan and Barbara Gruska are brother and sister and they are also indie folk rock duo The Belle Brigade.

Barbara and Ethan met when Ethan was born. They knew they were brother and sister but they did not know that 19 years in the future they would form a band. — The Belle Brigade 

I received this CD from a friend a few days ago after reading a couple articles about The Belle Brigade.  I wanted to give it a listen because they have opened for some great bands such as Fitz and The Tantrums and Awolnation in LA… at the El Rey Theater.  Hold up.  I was there?  That sounds way to familiar.  Needless to say I was confused.  I looked up a couple pictures of the band to try and jog my foggy memory and of course I recognized them right away!  How could I forget about them?!  Turns out I’ve been trying to remember this bands name/ where I had seen them since last november!  Well I’m glad my dumb luck worked out this time and I stumbled back onto this band.

Where Not to Look For Freedom – The Belle Brigade

The one thing I love about so called “family” bands are the harmonies.  There’s no question siblings seem to have a connection on another level.  It’s basically a male and female version of the same voice and they achieve better cleaner harmonies because of it.   With a signature of quick brush snare hits with sacred steel and fast acoustic strumming the appeal of The Belle Brigade is undeniable.  And with a great backing band morphing the sounds of two people into five it just gets better.

Lucky Guy – The Belle Brigade

This record is a little all over the place.  Not a bad thing, trust me.  They have pure country, a little rock-a-billy and some slow quiet folk tracks.

“We didn’t want to make something small and precious,” Barbara says. “We wanted to make something big and exhilarating. Recording this album was an incredible lesson at walking the line between holding on and letting go. Every note is intentional, but we gave up the reins to let the music go freely where it wanted to go. We wanted to make a record that was personal and aching, but still uplifting, relatable, and fun to listen to.” — Paradigm Artist Bio

Growing up in a musical household Barbara and Ethan were exposed to the likes of Michael Jackson to Dusty Springfield through their father who was a known songwriter in his own right.  With a studio in their LA area home’s back yard artists would come and go allowing the siblings to get inside and first hand experience listening to new music and hearing the process.  On top of that they also site the famed film and TV composer John Williams as a major influence.  To me this sounds about as musically well rounded as it gets.

The southern rock inspiration and country like harmonies are the driving force in this initial release, but I was very impressed with The Belle Brigade’s ability to turn the corner toward straight up rock and roll with a hint of that “indie” sound we all know and love.

Lonely Lonely – The Belle Brigade

And then they follow that tune up with a slow sad tune called “Punch Line,” a song featuring a gentle string arrangement strings and soaring harmonies.  On most records I don’t like it when bands decided to jump in and out of genre’s and have major shifts in volume on their records without easing my ears into it.  The juxtaposition between heavy and light, loud and quiet works very well here.  These two songs are part of a three song set that are my favorite part of the record.  The third song is called “Rusted Wheel” which is a song that starts off where “Punch Line” left off, slow.  Then it builds into a big harmony laden country song with elements from the two previous songs. These three tunes highlight the dynamic range of The Belle Brigade while showing their ability to rock out and have fun and then immediately settle down and bring out a sad song and then ease us right back into the “big and exhilarating” sounds that drive this record.

Punch Line – The Belle Brigade

Rusted Wheel – The Belle Brigade

I’m a big fan of The Belle Brigade and I’m glad I was able to stumble back into their music after a few months of searching.  This new full length release is a testament to good song writing and a partnership of great singing and musicianship.  There are a bunch more tunes on this record that I didn’t post in hopes that you will go out and buy this record.  It’s available on CD/ Vinyl or iTunes HERE.  The Belle Brigade’s tour page is HERE as well.  They are opening some dates for KD Lang all across the US and Canada.

Here’s the last tune from The Belle Brigades most recent self titled release.  It’s yet another example of the dynamic range this band has.

Fasten You To Me – The Belle Brigade

By: Steve Rippin | Beat-Play Ambassador Los Angeles | @stevewithMWL|Music Without Labels & Beat-Play, LLC

Middle Brother [NEW MUSIC]

Middle Brother is an American rock band consisting of songwriters and musicians John J. McCauley III of Deer Tick, Taylor Goldsmith of Dawes, and Matt Vasquez of Delta Spirit. They played their first show at the 2010 the SXSW film conference and festival at the Ale House in Austin, Texas, where they performed under the moniker “MG&V” in an unannounced appearance. The band played their first official show at The Troubadour in Los Angeles, California on December 20, 2010 under the official name of Middle Brother.

Find out more about them in their own words here with this Rolling Stone interview and at their Facebook, [dot] com or Twitter 

By: Shayne Byrne | Beat-Play Ambassador Ireland |@shaynewithMWL| Music Without Labels & Beat-Play, LLC

Grouplove [MUSIC VIDEO]

Living in LA is in a word, exciting.  There’s something magical about this city and cool things seem to happen here that normally wouldn’t happen any where else and for some crazy reason I keep getting to experience them.  My dad calls it “falling up,” but I think it’s just dumb luck.  So now imagine this:  A breezy mountain top over looking the Malibu Pier and the ocean with the bright Santa Monica Sky Line looming in the distance as the only sign of real civilization.  I’m standing on top of a roof that extends into a cliff.  The roof belongs to the Lloyd Wright (as in Frank Lloyd Wright) family and the sweet sounds of Grouplove echoing from the large deck/ stage surrounded by giant rocks and streams are creating an experience I’ll never forget.  And to top it all off there was BBQ.  The party was sponsored by Mini Cooper and the headliner was Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros, but this blogs not about them.  It’s all about Grouplove and their new amazing self titled EP.

Grouplove – Naked Kids

Released independently last year this record is a party.  Good ole fashion rock and roll with attitude.  Dirty acoutic guitars and the gritty vocals of Christian Zucconi are the driving force.  The band consisting of Hannah Hooper, Sean Gadd, Ryan Rabin and Andrew Wessen add even more awesomeness.  Reminiscent of Modest Mouse or The Raconteurs the talent and potential this band has is obvious.  Their live show was a massive ball of energy that warmed up the crowd on a chilly California night.

Their most recent/ only release is a five song EP.  Top to bottom its solid and a great initial effort.  It’s more then enough to spark attention and make me wait patiently for a full length offering.  My favorite song on the record is called “Colours.”  Lyrics are great and the melody is comletly original.  It’s only been stuck in my head for about a month.

Grouplove – Colours

A lot of bands meet in high school/ college or through people they meet at shows or through common friends.  Grouplove met on the island of Crete and reconviened in LA to create this EP and tour under the Grouplove moniker.  They are gaining momentum world wide having appeared on TV and radio.  This summer they are touring heavily and starting to play some big festivals.

It’s no surprise that a group of globetrotters would be on tour.  They are currently in the UK and on June 3rd they are headlining The Satellite Lounge in Silverlake.  They are also playing spots at this years Lollapalooza (Chicago) and Glastonbury Festivals (UK).  All their tour dates are listed HERE.

You can buy their EP HERE.  It’s cheap and worth it.

Last but not least here’s the last track from Grouplove.

Grouplove – Don’t Say Oh Well

By: Steve Rippin | Beat-Play Ambassador Los Angeles | @stevewithMWL|Music Without Labels & Beat-Play, LLC

Miami Horror [ALBUM REVIEW]

Australia has some explaining to do.  Mostly because whenever I hear music that comes from that part of the world I love it.  I don’t understand.  It must be something in the water.  Before I get into Miami Horror’s most recent release called “Illumination” I have a confession to make.  When I first heard this record, well mainly the first tune I wasn’t too pumped.  That’s why it should be a global rule to always listen to at least the first 4 tracks when introducing yourself to a new artist.  I live by that motto and therefore I’m all about what Miami Horror has to say.  “Illumination” is their first full length release and it came out in mid 2010.  This electro pop dance party on plastic seems to be just what the doctored ordered for those of you who obey the rules and regualtions of “thirsty thursday” or thirsty whenever.  To get the party started here’s a track called “Holidays”.

Holidays – Miami Horror

Honestly I felt like the 80’s just slapped me in the face on first listen.  Ok fine, on the second listen and third as well.  It’s obvious where Miami Horror’s musical inspiration is drawn from.  Melbourne’s Ben Plant is the man responsible for the pop synth electro rhythms on “Illumination” having planted the roots of his music and Miami Horror in his apartment with various synths and toys.  Wanting to make Miami Horror a full on band he acquired the likes of Josh Moriarty, Aaron Shanahan and Daniel Whitechurch who round out the rest of the band.

“It started out that I didn’t want to have any guitar on the album besides a little funk guitar or disco bass,” Ben grins while explaining the turning point for Miami Horror’s evolution. “But then Josh came in and started playing all these other parts that sounded amazing. Paired with what I was working on, nobody was doing anything like it, so I knew we had to turn those sounds into a live thing and just go wild.” — MiamiHorror.com

The record sounds massively fit for any dance club or rock club.  They are refined and extremely tight as a band.  They have played major festivals at home and have opened for major acts such as Phoenix, La Roux, Friendly Fires and Lily Allen abroad.

They have a lot of sick videos up on there site here (I got scolded by youtube when I embedded them on this page).  I don’t really condone the use of drugs nor do I preach it but if you watch this videos you might as well be trippin’ your ass off.  One of my favorite tracks on the record is called “I Look to You”.  The video is a prime example of how they pair their music with psychedelic visuals.

I Look to You – Miami Horror

“We’ve spent about ten months alone mixing the album, which is a process that should normally take two weeks,” Ben laughs. “We always just said ‘f**k it, we have to make the album that we want to make’ and this is it. We made it.” — MiamiHorror.com

With a definite case of perfectionism this record is fun to listen to, dance to, party to, drink to… pretty much anything accept sleep to.  They have just wrapped up a North and South American tour and are on their way down under for a full blown Australian tour.

Grand Illusion – Miami Horror

I can’t stress enough how much fun this band is to listen to especially if you enjoy getting down with your bad self alone with only your boxers on in the living room when your roommates aren’t home.  But enough about me, I’m stoked that I gave them the four song shot because I would have hated to miss out on this band.

You can buy “Illumination” HERE.  Check out the bands FACEBOOK page HERE.

Ok fine, here’s the last track on the record just for kicks…

Ultraviolet – Miami Horror

By: Steve Rippin | Beat-Play Ambassador Los Angeles | @stevewithMWL|Music Without Labels & Beat-Play, LLC

Behind The Board : Gavin Glass [Interview]

Q01 Who are you, What do you do & where are you based?

Gavin Glass. Producer/Musician/Songwriter. Orphan Recording – Harolds Cross.

Q02 What album,track,gig or producer inspired you to end up behind a mixing board

The Band’s “Brown Album” was the record that changed everything for me.

Q03 Where did you study your trade?

I didn’t do a sound course or anything like that, but I was very lucky to have worked with some amazing engineers like Paul Thomas and David Slevin when I was starting out playing in bands, so I learned an awful lot from recording with those guys.

Q04 What advice do you have for any budding engineers out there?

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