Tag Archives: entrepreneur

Chamillionaire Interview on ThisWeekIn.com [VIDEO]

Venture Capitalist, Mark Suster from Both Sides Of The Table VC Firm meets with Grammy winning rapper, Chamillionaire. Hear his side of entrepreneurship and marketing saavy and how he used this knowledge to leverage a successful career on his own in the music industry. Being a very honest person, Chamillionaire gives some great insight concerning all of the strings attached with involvement in the music industry and the business world all together. Also learn how social media can be leveraged from a artist and venture capitalist perspective to maintain a stable connection to your overall consumer base.

Simple Keys to a REALLY Successful Business

If you do the following, you can be 100% sure that your business will be incredibly successful.

First of all, when structuring your business you have to have the mindset of providing the best value to people. If you are approaching the organization of you business with the mind set of making money, you are going to be sadly disappointed later on down the line.

The money will come later. The sure way to secure that money is by forgetting about it, and focusing on how you can provide the most value possible to your consumers.

Study your market, study your competitors, and outdo them. Don’t study them and try to imitate them so you can fit into the market place. You want to distinguish yourself. Find out what they’re doing, and then find the problems, and fix them. That’s value to your customers.

I cannot stress this enough. You don’t have to know everything, you just have to know something nobody else knows. If you’re going to seminars, or taking business classes, you can be sure that the info you’re getting is widely accessible.

Finding what nobody knows means studying the circumstances of your market, making observations, and then structuring aspects of your business based on that.

Don’t be so anxious to ask people for advice. Come up with ideas on your own. Take time out of your day to just sit, and think. It’s these ideas that will be most valuable because chances are they haven’t been spread halfway around the world already.

Again, try searching out the problems in the industry. Focus all of your time trying to find the solutions to these problems. If a big problem exists, you can be sure that the solution is unknown knowledge, or there wouldn’t be a problem. Be the person to solve that problem, and your company will be off to a great start.

The most important thing to remember when starting your own company is be flexible, meaning be open to different opportunities or ideas that may emerge.

Nowadays, the most flexible resource we have is the internet. Be open to integrating your business with it, because it is a tool that can give your business instant flexibility.

Keep these things in mind when starting your business and you can be assured that you will have a successful future. The only other advice I can give is, be assured that you will have a successful future.

Written by: Dante Cullari Founder & President Beat-Play, LLC

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Business Owner Anxiety? Use the Clipboard Effect and De-Stressorize!

For any independent business owner, even if you’re an independent artist, being your own boss is tough. How do you stay on top of everything when you’re being pulled in a million different directions? Especially when there’s so many different responsibilities to keep track of? Here’s a couple tricks I’ve used to stop my own anxiety.

First, when I felt that the list of things I was in charge of was too big to even remember off hand, I made a spreadsheet. At the top left I wrote “Action Items:” Then below I listed all of the actions I go through(or should) almost daily, such as Blogging, Research, Drafting, Email, ect. Then every day I check off the categories I did and list the specific projects I worked on.

It helps me in a couple of different ways. It lets me know which areas I’m hitting the hardest and which ones need work. It also lets me track how much is actually getting done daily, and it gives me something to be proud of. Also it pushes me to be more productive so I can have the simple joy of checking off those boxes.

There’s just one other crucial step in this process: Get a clipboard. For some reason, there’s something official about having a clipboard with information regarding the productivity of your business. It is reassuring, and especially when your office is your living room or your basement, and your environment might not be so “official” looking, having something that represents that order to your business is important, and having things organized like that goes a long way for your peace of mind.

One more AWESOME and similar organizational tool for any business owner, that can sky rocket your productivity, is called the Mini Day Method. Check out that blog post for more info, it is REALLY worth looking into.

Today’s Advice: Don’t stress, buy a clipboard!

Written by: Dante Cullari, Founder & President Beat-Play, LLC

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Kids Ruling the World? Open Wide for the Jumbo Jet..

Sounds like not much would get done..but it could be more fun. In today’s smart phone social culture, information is more readily available than ever before. As of now, no one really knows the full repercussions of this on our society, but some signs have already begun to pop up.

Probably the most obvious is Mark Zuckerberg who is now 25 going on 26, and was only 20 when he started Facebook in 2004. 6 years later his website has over 350 million members and even old lame people are forced to jump on. Why is this? Because Mark came up with a better way to use the web as a tool to communicate than was previously in place. In my opinion, this could have only come from a younger person.

Being born in 1984, the exact year 29 year old Steve Jobs and Apple Computers launched their most famous product ever, the Macintosh, Mark Zuckerberg had grown up with computers. He was even programming in middle school; something which a decade before would have been reserved for only the most experienced hardware and tech nerds, and something which may not have happened if it wasn’t for people like Jobs and Woz.

For my father(58), to have seen the transformation from black & white photos and TV to all of the ridiculous gadgets made available today, like 3d printing and color multi-touch phones, just to have had email would have been sufficient. Email works soo much better than what he was used to growing up, that imagining better is made much harder, and seemingly useless in his eyes.

The bar with the younger generation is being set way higher, and we can expect this trend to continue exponentially. Another point to make is the rate at which change and innovation in business online can occur. Computers and the internet make everything amazingly easier to edit, update, change, delete, recover, and so on. This new medium has the potential to implement changes on a society scale much faster than was ever possible in the past, and increase our societal advancements exponentially as well, to follow along with the trend of doubling microchip capacity every 1-2 years.

Another reason for the breakthrough successes of many younger entrepreneurs may very well be their “naive” outlooks on the world. They seem misaligned with reality’s crushing sting and unfazed by thoughts of the many hopeless boundaries awaiting. However they’re amazingly successful..how could this be? Check out this excerpt from an AOL Small Business Blog titled A Teen Millionaire’s Three Principles to Success

“I’ve been fortunate enough to make my first million before graduating from high school and buy my own house at 20. At 21, I’ve now put away enough in savings and other investments that I could practically retire today . . . if I wanted to. But of course, that’s the last thing on earth I’d want to do. I just enjoy it all too much. Not to say the money isn’t important, but frankly, it’s not why I do what I do. I do it because I love it.” – Cameron Johnson

I can hear the passion in his voice just reading his words. Is this naive, or relevant? Actually, the answer to this question is a bit peculiar.

We are in the middle of a strange paradigm shift where the technology created by the older generation has effected society so much, that most of the problems that they faced in the past can be solved by this new technology. This doesn’t mean however, that the problems have been solved, because the older generation has somewhat failed, or has been slower to realize, that this is possible. Now though, It does mean that many members of the younger generation are beginning to realize these solutions that the internet and computers provide, and we’re beginning to implement them at tremendous paces.

Here’s a great analogy:
It’s like if the inventor of the light bulb was blind, and couldn’t really see the potential for his invention, so it sat idle; until one day another thinker with sight comes along, sees the potential, and installs telephone poles to carry the light around the globe. Now with this first invention of the light bulb, any innovator after will be able to see and work much longer, increasing the productivity for these potentially younger generations, solving potentially many problems at once, that would not have been solved if the potential of the lightbulb had not been realized. It wasn’t enough just for the invention to be created, but the potential had to be reached. Younger generations will always find new applications for great inventions. Thomas Edison would have never imagined 3D Imax Movie Projectors, or LEDs.

The internet’s progress has almost been put on hold compared to how fast it could be moving, because of the failure of the older generations to realize the true potential of computers, and especially the net. The main problem right now is that all of the best innovators are mostly too young to afford to maintain a start up, and only the most savvy, or lucky ones, actually make it.

This reminds me of a story. I’ve actually had the pleasure of meeting and talking with Doug Herzog, the President of Viacom. This is the same Doug Herzog who was president of Fox a while back and decided to cancel Family Guy..a mistake which the younger generation would haunt him with until he eventually left a year later. He was also featured in an episode of South Park that wanted to show a picture of the Prophet Muhammad, but Doug decided to censor it, which earned him a place in the show.

We met to discuss my business plan for Beat-Play. (BeatPlay Beta Overview) I won’t get into that right now, but one of the first things he told me was that he really had no idea what was going on at MTV on the “ground level.” He said he was just “so far separated from it.” After explaining my model to him, he couldn’t understand how Beat-Play was any different than iTunes. He couldn’t see how a completely free website that could solve piracy, promotion, and revenue problems for independent artists all over the world, was different than paying 99 cents for mostly artists heard on the radio. Me being 19 at the time, and him being unwilling to be schooled by a “kid”, I thanked Doug for his time, and strolled out.

This was one of the first signs of this “Senior blindness” that I had encountered. The truth is, iTunes doesn’t even begin to solve the problems the music business is still plagued with, but I guess being able to download music onto a mobile device you fit in your pocket is far enough away from old 45’s and 8-tracks that it’s easier to settle for the current circumstances. It may be better than before, but that doesn’t make it good! Also, a problem that still occurs to this day is that the problems with the music industry have been around so long that it’s not even feasible for many people that they could actually be solved..probably because before the internet, they couldn’t be..

This is a great quote from Inc Magazine blog titled A Portfolio of Young Business Owners

“Only five years ago, two enterprising teens might have mowed lawns to earn spending money. Today they can start a company on the Web. That’s how it worked for the co-founders of Switchpod, Weina Scott and Jake Fisher. And, oh yeah, they live 1,440 miles apart–she’s in Miami, and he’s in Rochester, Minnesota.”

Now wait until the younger generation reaches the full potential of the internet. Imagine how many other problems will be solved by more efficient organizational structure embedded into our societies.

Dare I say this is the first time in history that the younger generation may actually know better than the ones before it. Well..isn’t that what you would hope for? Things have changed..now it’s just up to people to realize it.

Written by: Dante Cullari, Founder & President Beat-Play, LLC

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