Tag Archives: music distribution

The Beat-Play Radio [Update]

Beat-Play is the first social radio app on Facebook - in internal beta now - the picture above shows Beat-Play still in progress

Beat-Play is a Facebook Radio App, launching in a few months, where you will “follow” people who you share a taste in music with (friends, favorite artists, family, etc). The songs that they like enough to actually save into their playlists, automatically get sent to your radio. If you like a song enough to save, it automatically gets sent to anybody following you.

This creates a viral spread of the music unlike anything seen before in music. It will completely level out the playing field, insuring that if the music is good enough to spread, it will. Beat-Play is completely devoted to helping independent artists create sustainable careers with their music.

A couple of other great benefits of Beat-Play:

  • It’s a FREE form of promotion and distribution for artists – and we believe it will be more efficient
  • It’s an incredibly easier way for fans to find and share music
  • It operates using free streams – free music for the fans!
  • Artists can get paid based off of plays, not sales, by generating ad revenue from their popularity. (more info)
  • Beat-Play uses “Piracy,” or music sharing, as a driving force for artist revenue instead of an opposing  force for it
  • Artists maintain full control over their music, their rights, and even the price of their ad space, and they never have to sign away a thing.
  • There’s no risk to try it

We are currently looking for more awesome music and artists to add to our app’s music library so that there can be music on the player when we launch officially, on Jan 31st 2011. If you would  like us to put your music on our radio app, please email our Customer Relations Director at Kian@musicwithoutlabels.com, and please include information about how to obtain your music in mp3 format.

We’re getting really excited about this, and it’s coming along beautifully!  We hope to hear from you!

– The Beat-Play Team

Share

Advertisements

A Look at New Artist Revenue Model: The Social Radio – By the Numbers

For those that don’t yet know, Beat-Play will be introducing the first ever social radio to the web in a few short months. It will run off of Facebook and will be fueled by social recommendations. With this radio app, if you like a song, it will automatically get sent to your friend’s radios, if they are following you. If they like it then, they pass it on to their followers.

Not only is this an awesome (free) form of viral promotion and distribution, but it can also be a completely new revenue model for artists as well, and I believe it’s a model worth looking deeper into, and worth doing some comparisons with what else is out there right now.

In this new model, the music is free for the fans. The artists will get paid based on ad revenues generated from their popularity. The artists essentially get paid from their plays. The more average plays/day they get, the more an artist can charge for their ad space (artists set their own prices).

Let’s get right to the numbers. We’ll start with an artist having an average of 20,000 plays/day. This may sound like a lot, but you must remember the environment that this will be in. With this viral automated word-of-mouth system, a steady supply of great music will always be fed right to the users without them having to search, and being filtered through people they trust, so the chances of them liking the music are greater as well.

With this system, the playing field would finally be leveled: If the music isn’t good, it won’t spread very far; if it is good, it will spread like wildfire.

As long as the artists pump out a steady supply of great music themselves, with even the smallest pre-established fan base to start with, I think building up to an average of 20,000 plays/day can be pretty achievable in not such a long time, with the right amount of hard work being focused to where it should be: on the music.

An ad appears every time a song plays. The ads themselves are unobtrusive and not interruptive, although they could be quite interactive and engaging if clicked, instead of damaging to the user’s experience. So say an artist has an average of 20,000 plays per day for a whole year, and the average price for their ad space is $6/1000 plays. At this price, the artist, in that one year, would make approx. $43,800.00 before taxes. Of course that also doesn’t include any merchandise or tour money.

That’s not too bad at all! Let’s compare this model now to some other artist revenue models out there.

I’m sure you’ve seen the following chart at some point before. I will use their averages because I feel they’re still pretty accurate.

So in the new social radio model, to make $43,800.00/year, the artist would need 7.3 million plays in that year. (Think about artists that get millions of plays in a day)

For Last.fm, according to the chart, to earn just $13,920 in one year, which is the US minimum wage, an artist would have to have 18.5 million plays in that year. To earn $43,800 on Last.fm, they’d have to have almost 60 million plays in one year!

It’s hard to compare this model with CD Baby or Itunes, because these 2 models are based on sales, not plays, and there will always be more plays than sales, but let’s try to compare anyway:

For an artist to earn approx. $43,800.00 on Itunes, they would have to sell over 450,000 singles; On CDbaby, over 75,000 singles. That’s a lot of credit card transactions no matter which site you choose.

Think about this too, when you make your money off of downloads, your only getting paid to sell a copy. That copy will get listened to hundreds, or thousands of times after the sale, but you only get paid once. Now I hope you can see the potential in the opportunity to monetize the plays of songs, with a proper ad model, instead of just selling copies to fans who love to share.

With this new model, the artists may finally be able to make a decent living off of just making and circulating their music, without having to kill themselves to market and promote their music, without signing away their souls for a distribution deal, and without having to worry about piracy taking all of their money! Maybe, with this new system, artists will be able to make the kind of money they should be making when they factor in shows, merch, music licensing, and any other opportunities that a model like this could potentially present.

I urge all independent artists to consider supporting a model like this, and to think about the kind of effect this model could have on your career. I’m an indie artist myself. It’s about time we start using a model that works for us.

If you would like to help us test this model, right now we need artists and music to be submitted to our social radio so we can continue testing internally. We’re getting really close to our Facebook launch.

Written by: Dante Cullari – Founder & CEO Beat-Play, LLC

Serious Payment for Stealing Music

prisoner

Who knew pirating music could be this serious of an offense in the court of law. Here is an interesting article we stumbleupon by CrunchGear. The woman was stuck in solitary confinement for 4 days, and this was in 2008. I couldn’t even begin to think what would happen now. The model for music distribution needs changed to keep the governments focus on things that are physically jeopardizing our country. Here is what CrunchGear had to say about it:

If the threat of making Madonna go hungry weren’t enough, CD pirates in Arkansas are now locked up in solitary and forgotten for four days.

[For] four full days, Adriana Torres-Flores was locked away and forgotten in 8 1/2-by-9 1/2-foot cell in the Washington County Courthouse, with only a metal table, two benches and a light bulb that never went out. She had nothing to eat or drink. There was no toilet. Thursday passed. Then Friday, Saturday and Sunday – although Torres-Flores had no watch to tell the time. She slept on the floor with her head on a shoe. She drank her own urine, she said.

That’s right, kids: even if it’s just a copy of In Rainbows, pirating CDs is a pee-drinking offense. Artists need to eat green M&Ms and meth too!