Tag Archives: singer songwriter

The Man Whom – The Greatest Event [NEW MUSIC]

The Man Whom is the moniker for Wexford-based singer songwriter, producer/composer and multi-instrumentalist Ian Doyle. The Greatest Event is his debut Album. With the help of musicians and friends, Brian Hassett (bass), Christian Best (drums), Doyle and his band retreated to the seclusion of a house in Kilrane Village and worked intensely to record the majority of the album. The piano parts were …subsequently recorded in the local arts centre.

Further contributions to Doyle’s album include polished string arrangements written by composer Peter Fahey and performed by the Mamisa Quartet, as well as local guitarist Clive Barnes who played peddle steel for the current single Over and Under.

For the finishing touches, Doyle went to Exchequer Studios, Dublin with producer Brian Crosby and mixing engineer Phil Hayes who shaped and honed the original recordings. The result is an album which is the sum of its parts, held together by a shoestring and interwoven with the goodwill of creative, talented friends.

WHAT OTHERS HAVE SAID :

Hotpress 4.5/5

Sing Till There’s No Songs Left’ features emotive harmonies, uplifting brass, and swagger in spades. ‘Over And Under’ brims with good vibes, while ‘Leavin This Town’, with its unsettling melancholy, is a handsome tune with a lyrical edge that makes it relevant to these forlorn times. The string-tinged and choral ‘Easier To Run’ is almost illegally heart-breaking, while the restrained ‘Call All The People’ climbs with uncanny power, with Doyle taking it to higher and higher levels of elation. ‘Puppeteers’ is a long-held favourite of mine and ‘Til It’s Gone’ wraps it all up so you want to start all over again. The Greatest Event has enough charm and inventiveness to fill your head and nourish your soul. Eat it.

The Sunday Times ****
A slick production with accomplished musicians, elaborate scores and scrupulous string arrangements. Call all the People has the heartfelt passion of an anthem, including melodic bursts of melancholia, while Sing Till There’s No Songs Left, I know your Face, and Over and Under, the current single, strike all the right chords.

News of the World on Sunday ****
This debut album from Wexford man Ian Doyle takes the joyousness of Sufjan Stephens and the unusual phrasing of Villagers, filtering those elements into an eventful listen.

The Irish Times***
“New name, fresh approach, adventurous songwriter: that’s Wexford’s The Man Whom (aka Ian Doyle) for you. Songs such as I Know Your Face and The Man Who Knew Too Much display Doyle’s nifty craftsman- like process, while Call All the People and Autopilot highlight a working knowledge of the kind of music and musings that have gained him comparisons to Villagers and Neil Young. Out of the blue, then – another new, good Irish singer-songwriter”.

for more check out http://www.themanwhom.com

By: Shayne Byrne | Beat-Play Ambassador Ireland | @shaynewithMWL | Music Without Labels & Beat-Play, LLC

Richard Buckner – Our Blood [NEW MUSIC]

Richard Buckner is an American singer-songwriter born in California. After living in Edmonton, Alberta for a number of years, he currently resides in Brooklyn, NY. A critically acclaimed artist hailed by Bon Iver as a big influence and most often associated with the alternative country movement, Buckner had in recent albums eschewed his initial acoustic approach and displayed an increasing interest in more abstract music styles until reintegrating his acoustic approach on 2011’s “Our Blood”.

Buckner’s career began with Bloomed (1994), a lyrically-dense suite of songs recorded in Lubbock, Texas (produced by Lloyd Maines) and heavily influenced by that state’s tradition of whiskey-soakedpoet/troubadors, probably best embodied by Townes Van Zandt. (Since 1999, the album has been kept in print (with additional bonus tracks) by Rykodisc offshoot Slow River Records at Buckner’s request, the artwork on the back cover was edited to remove his then-girlfriend from the picture.) In January 1996, while living in San Francisco, he recorded an album’s worth of acoustic songs, all of which would reappear in more fully realized forms on his second and third albums. This CD was self-produced and self-released, and was sold exclusively at his early shows.

Later that year, he signed with MCA Records, for whom he recorded two albums, both produced by J.D. Foster. Devotion + Doubt was released in 1997, displaying a more adventurous, almost avant-gardeapproach to songwriting and arranging, and featuring backing from members of the band Giant Sand, as well as Maines and Marc Ribot, among others. Its follow-up, 1998’s Since, continues in this style, with an even greater emphasis on detailed production, this time featuring contributions from John McEntire, Dave Schramm, David Grubbs, Syd Straw, and others. Although these albums garnered considerable critical approval for Buckner, they did not perform well enough for his label, and he was released from his contract with MCA (whom he then nicknamed ‘Musical Career Assassins’) shortly thereafter.

Since then, he has returned to recording for smaller labels, to continued critical acclaim and cult status. His 2000 album The Hill – his first for Chicago-based indie label Overcoat Recordings – features poems from Edgar Lee Masters’ Spoon River Anthology(1915), which Buckner set to music. The album plays as a single track, nearly thirty-five minutes long. He returned in 2002, first with the “teaser” EP Impasse-ette, then a full-length entitled Impasse one month later. In early 2003, his self-released, self-titled album was reissued by Overcoat, and was his final release for the label. In 2004, an edited version of Richard Buckner’s song “Ariel Ramirez”, from the album Since (1998) was featured in one of the television ads for Volkswagen’s Touareg. The song, in its original form, would be featured prominently in the 2008 horror film, The Strangers.

 

He is currently aligned with North Carolina-based indie label Merge Records, who have released two of his albums so far: 2004’s Dents and Shells and 2006’s Meadow. Between the two, he released an album with Jon Langford (most notably of The Mekons) called Sir Dark Invader vs. The Fanglord (2005, originally recorded in Sally Timms’s house in 2002) on Buried Treasure Records. Merge Records released Buckner’s long awaited new album “Our Blood” on August 2, 2011. The album was licensed in Europe and Oceania to Decor records.

for more info and updates go to : http://www.richardbuckner.com/

By: Shayne Byrne | Beat-Play Ambassador Ireland | @shaynewithMWL | Music Without Labels & Beat-Play, LLC

Jonathan Wilson – Gentle Spirit [NEW MUSIC]

File:Jonathan Wilson at Troubadour 2.jpg

Wilson completed a solo album titled, Frankie Ray in 2007. The record was never officially released. Since, Wilson has recorded the full length album, Gentle Spirit, which will be released in 2011 on Bella Union. Gentle Spirit features many special guests including Barry Goldberg, Chris Robinson, Gary Louris, Andy Cabic, Otto Hauser, Josh Grange, Gary Mallaber, Z Berg, Adam McDougall, Johnathan Rice, among others. In July 2011 Wilson will will perform and collaborate with Jackson Browne and Dawes on several shows in Spain. Wilson was invited to perform on the 2011 benefit concert for Musicians United for Safe Energy (MUSE) at Shoreline Amphitheater. Joining Wilson is Crosby, Stills & Nash, Jackson Browne, Bonnie Raitt, John Hall, The Doobie Brothers, Jason Mraz, Tom Morello, Kitaro, Sweet Honey In The Rock and others. In 2010 and 2011, Wilson collaborated with Erykah Badu in the studio on several songs, only one of which was officially released. Wilson also appeared as a special guest with Erykah Badu at her 2011 Coachella performance.

Wilson currently maintains his recording studio, Five Star Studio, in Echo Park, Los Angeles, which he relocated from its original location in Laurel Canyon in 2009. The space is renowned for its sound and analog recording equipment. In 2010, Wilson produced and collaborated with Bonnie ‘Prince’ Billy on a series of songs for release on Spiritual Pajamas Records, a boutique 7″ label associated with Folk Yeah Presents. Wilson co-produced and played on the new solo record by J. Tillman of theFleet Foxes which was mixed by Phil Ek, whose album credits include Built to Spill, Fleet Foxes, Band of Horses, Modest Mouse, The Shins, etc. Wilson recorded and produced Dawes’ debut album, North Hills, at his Laurel Canyon studio. Wilson recorded and produced Dawes’ second album, Nothing Is Wrong, in 2010 at Five Star Studio. As part of Wilson’s project, What You Need Is What You Have, The Songs of Roy Harper, Wilson has produced songs performed by Will Oldham, Andy Cabic,Chris Robinson, Benji Hughes, Dawes, Jenny O., Johnathan Rice, Josh Tillman, and others. Wilson also produced Jason Boesel’s album, Hustler’s Son, and Mia Doi Todd’s album, Cosmic Ocean Ship. Wilson has also recorded and/or produced many other artists in his studio, including Gerald Johnson, James Gadson, and Josh Tillman.

Wilson is credited with revitalizing the Laurel Canyon music scene with the help of his many friends and is featured in the 2009 book Canyon of Dreams by rock historian Harvey Kubernik. Wilson had hosted private jam sessions at his compound in Laurel Canyon that involved Andy Cabic, Pat Sansone and John Stirratt of Wilco, Gerald Johnson, Johnathan Rice, Gary Louris and Mark Olson of The Jayhawks, Chris Robinson of The Black Crowes, David Rawlings, Benmont Tench of Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, Jacob Dylan, and other notable artists who’ve played professionally with and/or in Electric Flag, Paul Butterfield Blues Band, Van Morrison, The Cars, Bruce Springsteen, Steve Miller Band, and Pearl Jam. The jam was founded by Wilson and Chris Robinson.

For more info & Tour Dates etc check out http://songsofjonathanwilson.com/

By: Shayne Byrne | Beat-Play Ambassador Ireland | @shaynewithMWL | Music Without Labels & Beat-Play, LLC

 

Nathaniel Rateliff – In Memory Of Loss [New Music]

The first things you notice are the voice and the space. That voice belongs to Nathaniel Rateliff, a man who’s earned the twang and hard-knock weariness that shines through on his Rounder debut. The space comes courtesy of producer Brian Deck (Califone, Iron & Wine, Modest Mouse), who helped transform 8-track bedroom demos into miniature epics of contrast, beauty, and yearning. In Memory of Loss is a stunning, heartbreaking sonic document from a singer-songwriter who’s made his way from a childhood in Bay, Missouri (pop. 60) to the national stage.

Rateliff grew up of modest means, the son of devout Southern churchgoers. The family sang together throughout his childhood. At age 7 Rateliff learned the drums. As a teenager, he stumbled across a cassette of Led Zeppelin’s IV abandoned in a local barn; he wore the tape out listening to it on headphones, drumming along with “When the Levee Breaks” and “Misty Mountain Hop.”

Rateliff’s youth in rural Missouri was quiet and rambling. He built skateboard ramps, explored caves, slept outdoors in the heat. “I loved growing up there,” he says. “It’s beautiful. There’s something really nice about there not being much to do; it really helped me be a creative person.” After his father passed away, when Rateliff was only 13, he picked up the guitar. His mother taught him three chords, a friend showed him a few more, and there was no need to bother with lessons; he started penning his own songs on an acoustic. He’d later go electric, gaining an appreciation for the freedom of effect pedals: “I was really into making feedback for hours at a time.” Both impulses are present on In Memory of Loss, with its shards of raw guitar rising beneath hushed, insistent melodies.

At eighteen Rateliff relocated to Denver. He scored a job with a trucking company, working on the dock and the yard. The money was good, but Rateliff kept falling asleep at the wheel. “I had a little stint of narcolepsy,” he says. “My limbs were going numb, the color was all weird in ‘em. My thyroid wasn’t working. Weird stuff that shouldn’t be happening when you’re in your 20s, but it was.” After a battery of tests Rateliff decided to take time off from the job. It was a period of rest and recovery, but also one of artistic growth and fresh challenges. Rateliff used the break to learn the piano, much as he had other instruments—by teaching himself. The first song he tackled was Leonard Cohen’s melancholy classic, “Hallelujah.” (That same mixture of the sacred and profane is recognizable on “We Never Win,” with its throwbacks to gospel vocal harmonies, Rateliff harkening to “an old time revival.”)

Meanwhile, Rateliff developed a dedicated following within the Denver music community and beyond. Spin praised his “massive, alluring” voice. Billboard dubbed the unsigned singer-songwriter a ‘must hear.’ This wave of acclaim lead to a live set on the popular indie site Daytrotter and a solo tour opening for the Fray. The New York Times praised Rateliff’s “stark, eloquent [Johnny] Cash echoes,” and he earned enthusiastic mentions from Time Out New York and the tastemaker music blog, Brooklyn Vegan. New York magazine pegged Rateliff as an “artist everyone should be listening to” during the pivotal CMJ Music Festival.

Rateliff began writing a different sort of song than he was used to: quieter, more introspective and patient. A friend turned him on to the bedroom recording potentials of the time-honored 8-track, and a new working method was born. “I just kind of went back to my roots,” he says. “It was a different sound, but it was still coming from the same place.”

While recording In Memory of Loss, Rateliff lived in Chicago, working with producer Brian Deck to craft the nuances: mournful harmonica on “You Should’ve Seen the Other Guy,” the ominous organ of “Longing and Losing,” propulsive bass drum on “Early Spring Till.” Rateliff’s Rounder debut is rooted in a bygone era. It’s both fresh and classic, imbued with a melancholy nostalgia, the rough candor of rock’n’roll’s past and the warmth and earnestness of folk storytellers. Rateliff has a personal connection to the sounds of the 60s and 70s. “It was more about songs, and not about an industry,” he says. “It was about a movement, not about making money. I think we’re moving back into that again. There’s still an importance in actually writing songs again. People are interested in hearing things that make sense.”

These thirteen tracks, with their soulful minimalism, certainly make sense. Hints of the music he grew up on – Van Morrison, Muddy Waters, the Beatles—shine through. (Album closer “Happy Just To Be,” with its pounding piano chords, is a close cousin to the Lennon-penned “Across the Universe.”) Yet Rateliff is also at home in what may be called, for lack of a better term, the neo-folk revival. His voice is so confident that you can occasionally imagine the music dropping out entirely, a song propelled solely by Rateliff’s a capella strengths—equal parts church spiritual and TV on the Radio riffing on the Pixies’ “Mr. Grieves.”

“The one thing that made me want to write and play music was trying to get the same feeling that it gave me when I listened to it,” Rateliff says. “Like having an anxiety attack—where you almost start to weep, at the same time feel a strange pressure in your chest.” This persistent troubadour has struggled and persevered to this point; now, the wider world is ready for Nathaniel Rateliff. “In Memory of Loss,” he says, “is for everyone who’s willing to listen.”

Keep up to date with all things Nathaniel @ his Facebook or [Dot Com]

By: Shayne Byrne | Beat-Play Ambassador Ireland |@shaynewithMWL| Music Without Labels & Beat-Play, LLC

Gavin Glass – New Studio Demos [Video]

Gavin Glass is a multi-instrumentalist/singer-songwriter from Stillorgan, Dublin, Ireland.

His first album “I’d like the world to teach me to sing” 2004 was a lo-fi home recording which saw the musician trying to find his feet as a solo artist.
Prior to this, Gavin, had played guitar with various unsuccessful Dublin rock bands.
Having returned from Germany after his band Gramophone’s label went bust (weeks before the album’s scheduled release), Glass began writing and recording songs at his home studio in the sleepy suburbs of Killiney in Dublin.
The album showed promise but it wasn’t until his second release “Gavin Glass & The Holy Shakers” (2007) that Glass began to find his own voice.

Gavin Glass :: Better left alone from Steve Mogerley on Vimeo.

The “Shakers” record had an unashamed old-school feel and was steeped in traditional country, soul & gospel flavours all augmented by Glass melodic sensibilities and delivered by a very seasoned band of accomplished musicians.
The album was critically acclaimed by the Irish press and provided Glass with a strong late night radio following along with some very high profile fans such as Clarence Clemons of the E-Street Band & Garth Hudson of Glass’s musical heroes, “the Band”.

In 2008 Glass joined Lisa Hannigan’s band as a multi-instrumentalist and spend most of 2008 & 2009 touring North America & the UK.
It was after Hannigan’s performance at SXSW 2008 that Glass headed to Nashville to record his third album “Myna Birds” which was released last May, 2010.

An introduction to Steve Gorman of the Black Crowes after a show in Boston led to an invitation to record in Nashville. Gorman made some calls and put together an all-star dream band that featured a rather impressive array of fine luminaries: Audley Freed (Black Crowes, Train, Dixie Chicks), Ken Coomer (Wilco, Uncle Tupelo) and Jen Gunderman (Jayhawks).
Gavin set-up camp in Nashville’s Eastwood Studios and recorded the album on the endangered format of analogue tape over an intensive two-weeks in March of last year.
The album was then completed with the help of friends back in Dublin in between Hannigan’s hectic touring schedule.

Glass continues to run his own studio and in 2010 produced albums by Our Little Secrets, Gallie, Emma Jane Leeson, Steve Young & The Union.

catch more info here @ his Facebook & Twitter sites

Gavin Glass :: Good Fortune from Steve Mogerley on Vimeo.

By: Shayne Byrne | Beat-Play Ambassador Ireland |@shaynewithMWL| Music Without Labels & Beat-Play, LLC

Colm Lynch [VIDEO]

New logo , nice isnt it (O: in My Photos by

Lynch’s much-anticipated debut album, A Whisper in a Riot oozes with a confidence, passion and steely determination unusual in a first offering……. might be the most exciting thing you’ve heard in years.
Colm O’ Hare, Hotpress

Lyrically and musically, Lynch is a super sized cut above the rest with songs that stick in your memory.
Orla O’ Brien, In Dublin.

The lyrics are more Dylan than Rice, the energy more Paul Weller than Paddy Casey.
Bianca Lukyx, TV Now.

Cinematic, stylish, different……..very different and very good.
Dave Fanning 2FM
Colm Lynch is possibly the best Irish newcomer to emerge from 2006. A Whisper In A Riot is one of the albums from last year

that just shouldn’t be missed.
In Dublin.

Superb debut……..it is the lead man’s vocals that will ultimately win you over.
Gareth Maher, Totally Dublin.

I don’t know why he’s not in everyone’s record collection. I think he’s fantastic.
Michelle Harding, Acoustic Highway, RTE Radio1

Exceptional debut album.
Eddie Rowley, Sunday World.

I heard Colm play in Dalkey recently and I thought he was super so I asked him to come in today to sing a few songs……his version of Hallelujah is really beautiful.
Karen Coleman, The Wide Angle, Newstalk, Christmas Eve 2006

Colm does seem to have a direct line to the spirits of Dylan and Mike Scott.
Kevin Courtney, Irish Times

It’s fair to say that Killiney native Colm Lynch is entering a hugely crowded market of singer/songwriters, but his debut major-label single indicates that Damien Rice et al might be able to squeeze out just a little more.
Shilpa Ganatra, Hotpress

………..a captivating live performer with fantastic songs. Machine-gun percussuve playing accompanies unusual lyrical content and a vivid stage presence.
http://www.irelandlogue.com/guide/music/artists

Best Male 2007
BalconyTV Awards,Sugar Club June 9 , 2007

…comes on like a one man hoedown.
Tim Smyth, Trinity News

….his expressive vocals and narrative style carry occasional echoes of the Blood on the Tracks-era Dylan…… it is his literate and incisive lyrics that really distinguish him from dozens of other Irish artists.
Eistmusic

This album is a great addition to any collection…6 out of 6
http://www.musicreviewunsigned.com

…glorious, beautifully crafted songs of a real troubadour whose lyrical edge will knock you for six……delighting audiences with his charismatic live performances
Sinister Pete, Phantom 105.2

……reminiscent of latter-day Van Morrison…….even a hint of Springsteen in Lynch’s passionate, soulful delivery..
Stephen Errity, Hot Press

Find out more and keep up to date with Colm @ his Facebook page

By: Shayne Byrne | Beat-Play Ambassador Ireland | @shaynewithMWL| Music Without Labels & Beat-Play, LLC

Luke Slott – Create in Me a Pure Heart [MUSIC]

Create in Me a Pure Heart Cover Art

The enchanting music of Luke Slott has been compared to Philip Glass and Michael Nyman. Born to a family of actors, musicians, writers, producers and choreographers, and raised in a house with a hundred talking parrots, dogs, rabbits and reptiles, the 26-year-old multi-instrumentalist Slott grew up in the menagerie of his Dublin family home hearing music – human and animal – from all sides. His brother Mike Slott forms half of acclaimed hip hop duo, Heralds of Change, while their father, the late trumpet-player Mike Nolan, was the founder of Ireland’s longest-running jazz club.

At the age of twelve, Luke began learning the trumpet from his father via old records by jazz legends like Chet Baker and Miles Davis, and then went on to study classical piano at the Royal Irish Academy of Music. Having won the Heineken Green Energy Band Challenge and signed a major record deal at the tender age of 18, Slott spent several years as lead singer with Irish rock band Melaton, but after two critically-acclaimed singles and a never-released album, he left the band and started to explore other areas of music.

In 2005, Slott conceived and hosted a series of multi-cultural-house-concerts entitled ‘Unity-in-Diversity’ in his Dublin family home, where crowds of friends and neighbours would gather each week to attend intimate performances by some of Ireland’s leading musicians, and recitals by some of her best-loved poets. Saxophonist Keith Donald (Moving Hearts), flautist Brian Dunning (Puck Fair), violinist Cora Venus Lunny, cellist-singer Vyvienne Long, poets Macdara Woods and Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin, as well as a host of Irish bands including the Chapters and Star Turtle, were among the many artists who shared their talents in Slott’s family home. ‘Sometimes we’d have 70 people packed into these concerts in our living-room,’ Slott recalls. ‘Each week we would cook food from a different part of the world, and share some ideas from different cultures. It was a big undertaking, but I think it brought a lot of people together.’

In 2006, Slott left Ireland and moved to New York, where he taught music, played piano in restaurants, and honed his song-writing skills in the clubs and open-mics of downtown Manhattan. A year and a half later, he returned to Ireland and set out on a tour of house-concerts around the country (‘I just called a bunch a friends and said, “Hey, can I play a concert in your house?”,’ says Slott). In between playing concerts in living-rooms around Ireland, he began to record a batch of piano compositions which he had written in the years since Melaton. He then launched his own website, and promised a free 2-track CD of his piano music to the first 1000 visitors to www.lukeslott.com. He indeed fulfilled his promise, and sent 1000 free CDs around the world. ‘It broke the bank,’ says Slott, ‘but I think fans really appreciate getting a gift directly from the artist. It has given me an invaluable connection to my listeners.’

Slott continues to sing and write songs and promises a return to the singer-songwriter scene in due course, but his ambitious debut release as a solo artist is the instrumental ‘Don’t Go Back To Sleep’, a collection of ten pieces for solo piano whose darkly humorous waltzes hint at Slott’s love of Chopin – a fitting nod to his own Polish ancestry.

By: Shayne Byrne | Beat-Play Ambassador Ireland | @shaynewithMWL | Music Without Labels & Beat-Play, LLC

Gregory Alan Isakov – This Empty Northern Hemisphere [ALBUM REVIEW]

Waking up on a couch at 6am is usually one of the roughest thing you can do after a night out but when your woken up by “if I go, I’m goin” which featured at the end of the new episode of Californication it aint such a bad way to wake.

South African born, Philadelphia raised & Colorado based Gregory Alan Isakov’s 4th album “This Empty Northern Hemisphere” which features “if I go, I’m goin” is sure to open his music up to a wider audience and too right. He has shared stages with Ani Difranco, Rodrigo y Gabriela, Calexico, Brandi Carlile and Fiona Apple.

His Songs are plush with glowing arrangements. String sections that compliment and never overpower the more folksy
instrumentation of delicate banjo and accordion and nylon sting guitars. Backed by Brandi Carlile on a handful of tunes he delivers melodies that warm the heart and embed his lyrics in your mind long after the record stops. recorded in many different locations. a closed down bookshop, his apartment, in studio and at Carlile’s house his loosely woven folk music is in the vein of Iron & Wine, acoustic Springsteen and I’m sure I could go on but to do that would make less of Gregory as an artist in his own right.

Here is a live version of album highlight Virginia May featuring Brandi Carlile.

you can pick up a copy from links provided on his website here
http://www.gregoryalanisakov.com/music/